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Sons who fail to rise and live up to their old men’s legacy

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Sons who fail to rise and live up to their old men’s legacy
Glen Rice, Jr., son of an NBA legend, becomes the latest player who couldn’t get out of the big shadow thrown by his old man. -- REY JOBLE

IT’S HARD when someone throws a big shadow, especially when it comes from an NBA legend.

Sons who fail to rise and live up to their old men’s legacy
Glen Rice, Jr., son of an NBA legend, becomes the latest player who couldn’t get out of the big shadow thrown by his old man. — REY JOBLE

Glen Rice was a former NBA All-Star Most Valuable Player and part of the Los Angeles Lakers’ three-time champion team.

So when his son, Glen Jr., showed up and played for the TNT KaTropa on Sunday, basketball observers were keenly anticipating whether the son could rise to expectations.

But the second generation player failed to live up to performance and the KaTropa were beaten badly by the Rain or Shine Elasto Painters.

TNT coach Nash Racela could only hope Glen Jr. could play better in the next game, but mentioned his team was beaten soundly not just because of Rice’s sub par performance.

“It’s not about his name, but the performance. I hope he gets better. It’s hard to base it in today’s game because we missed major players. We’re talking about our three players from Gilas Pilipinas, plus (Troy) Rosales, plus (Anthony) Semerad. It’s hard when you lost those players and you’re forced to use your 13th to 15th player, mahirap,” Mr. Racela told sportswriters.

Rice finished with only 19 points on six-of-22 shooting. He only had three points in the first half, then scored 16 the rest of the way when the game was virtually decided.

A player who had a brief stint with the Washington Wizards in the NBA, Rice isn’t the only son of a legend who failed to live up to high expectations.

George Gervin, Jr., the son of “The Iceman” George Gervin, was nowhere near his dad’s explosiveness when the former played for the Coca-Cola Tigers about a decade ago.

Byron Houston, son of Curtis Perry, who saw action in the “Greatest Game Ever Played,” the 1976 Finals Game between the Phoenix Suns and the Boston Celtics, was a decent player but still pales in comparison with his old man.

Eric Wise, who saw action for the Barako Bull Energy three years ago, didn’t have the same steadiness and scoring prowess possessed by his dad, the late Francoise Wise, who played for Tanduay and Manila Beer during the 1980s. — Rey Joble

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